What Causes a Black Eye Without Trauma?

Do you have a black eye but don’t remember getting hit? Here are some possible causes of a black eye without trauma.

Checkout this video:

Types of Black Eyes

A black eye is usually the result of trauma to the head or face and can be caused by a number of different things. The most common type of black eye is a result of a blow to the eye or head, which causes the blood vessels in the eye to rupture and bleed.

Trauma

The most common cause of a black eye is trauma to the head or eye area. This can happen if you get hit in the face with a fist, ball, or other object. It can also occur if you receive a blow to the head that doesn’t directly hit your eye. The force of the blow can cause your eye to swell and discolor.

Other causes of black eyes include:

eyelid surgery
facial surgery
dental work
A black eye can also be caused by a disease or condition that results in bleeding under the skin around your eye. This can happen if you have high blood pressure, diabetes, or an autoimmune disease. If you take blood thinners, you’re also at risk for developing a black eye without trauma.

Surgery

One type of black eye that doesn’t involve trauma is called a periorbital hematoma, which occurs when blood collects in the space between the eyelid and the eye. This can happen from surgery, as well as from other conditions that cause increased pressure in the head, such as a brain tumor or an aneurysm. In some cases, a periorbital hematoma may require treatment with drainage and Steri-Strips (thin strips of medical tape).

Hemorrhage

A black eye is bruising and swelling around the eye, usually as a result of an injury. It can happen to anyone at any age. The blackness of a black eye comes from the clotting of small blood vessels under the skin. A black eye usually heals on its own within a week or two.

There are different types of black eyes, depending on the cause of the injury. A minor injury may cause a superficial black eye, also called a shiner, which is when there is bruising around the eye but no break in the skin. A more severe injury may cause a deep black eye, which is when there is both bruising and swelling around the eye and a break in the bone or skin.

There are several different types of black eyes, including:
-Superficial black eye: This type of black eye is also called a shiner. It occurs when there is bruising around the eye but no break in the skin.
-Deep black eye: This type of black eye occurs when there is both bruising and swelling around the eye and a break in the bone or skin.
-Orbital floor fracture: This type of fracture occurs when there is a break in one of the bones that make up the floor of the orbit (the bony socket that holds your eyeball). An orbital floor fracture can cause a deep black eye because it can damage nearby blood vessels and nerves.
-Subconjunctival hemorrhage: This type of hemorrhage (bleeding) occurs when blood leaks into the space between the white part of your eyeball and your clear inner eyelid (conjunctiva). A subconjunctival hemorrhage can cause your entire eyeball to appear red or bloodshot.

Causes of Black Eyes

A black eye is usually the result of trauma to the head or face, which causes the small blood vessels in the area to break and bleed. However, there are a few other causes of black eyes that don’t involve trauma. Let’s take a look at a few of them.

Trauma

A black eye is bruising around the eye that happens when small blood vessels under the surface of the skin break. This causes blood to leak into tissues around the eye.

A black eye is usually caused by an injury to the head or a blow to the face. The force of the impact breaks delicate blood vessels under the skin, causing a bruise.

Injuries that can cause black eyes include:
-Falls
-Car accidents
-Sports injuries
-Fights or punches
-Objects striking the face

Surgery

While most black eyes are caused by physical trauma, there are other causes as well. One of the most common is surgery. If you have surgery near your eye, there is a risk of bruising and swelling. This can lead to a black eye.

Other causes of black eyes include:
-Allergies
-Infections
-Reactions to medications
-Dental problems
-Glaucoma
-Cancer
-Blood clotting disorders

Hemorrhage

A black eye is usually the result of trauma to the eye. However, there are other causes of black eyes that don’t involve trauma. These include:

Hemorrhage: A black eye can be caused by a bleed under the eye, which is called a subconjunctival hemorrhage. This kind of hemorrhage happens when tiny blood vessels in the eye burst and leak blood into the space under the conjunctiva, the clear membrane that covers the white part of your eye. A subconjunctival hemorrhage can be caused by a sudden increase in blood pressure, such as from coughing or sneezing too hard. It can also happen if you take blood-thinning medication or have a bleeding disorder.

Allergies: Allergies can cause your eyes to itch, water, and swell. This can lead to breaking blood vessels in your conjunctiva and result in a black eye.

Infection: An infection in your sinuses or tear ducts can cause black eyes. Sinus infections are usually accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever, fatigue, and facial pain or pressure.

Scroll to Top