How to Help Someone Who’s Trauma Bonded

Trauma bonding is a real phenomenon that can keep people in abusive relationships. If you know someone who’s in an abusive relationship, here’s how you can help.

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Introduction

When a person has been through a traumatic experience, they can develop what is known as a trauma bond. This is a strong emotional connection to someone who has caused them harm. Often, the bond is formed because the abuser provides relief from the pain of the trauma.

The bond can make it very difficult for the victim to leave the abusive situation. They may feel like they can’t live without the abuser, even if the abuse is severe.

If you know someone who is trauma bonded, there are things you can do to help them. You can’t force them to leave the abusive situation, but you can provide support and understanding. You can also help them to find resources that can assist them in breaking free from the bond.

What is trauma bonding?

When someone experiences trauma, their brain goes into survival mode. This causes them to form what is known as a trauma bond with their abuser. The bond is created through a mix of positive and negative reinforcement. The positive reinforcement could be things like attention, love, and approval. The negative reinforcement could be things like threats, intimidation, and physical abuse.

The bond is a way for the victim to survive the abuse. It gives them hope that things will get better and that their abuser will change. Unfortunately, the bond can also make it very difficult for the victim to leave the abusive relationship.

If you know someone who is in an abusive relationship, there are a few things you can do to help them break the trauma bond:

-Encourage them to talk about their feelings. It’s important for them to express what they’re going through. This can help them process their emotions and start to see the abuse for what it is.

-Offer support and understanding. Let them know that you’re there for them and that you understand what they’re going through.

-Help them develop a support network. This could include family, friends, therapist, or a support group for victims of domestic violence.

-Encourage them to seek professional help. A therapist can help them work through the emotions they’re feeling and start to heal from the abuse.

-Help them develop a safety plan. This should include things like where they can go if they need to leave quickly, how to get in touch with important people, and how to keep their belongings safe.

The three C’s of trauma bonding

There are three main components to helping someone who is trauma bonded:

-Care: Showing care and concern for the person’s well-being
-Connection: Establishing and maintaining a connection with the person
-Communication: clear and effective communication

How to help someone who’s trauma bonded

If you know or suspect that someone you care about is trauma bonded, there are a few things you can do to help.

First, it’s important to understand that trauma bonding is a type of pathological attachment that can form between two people. This attachment is usually characterized by an intense and unhealthy emotional connection, as well as a pattern of codependent behavior.

If you suspect that someone you know is trauma bonded, the best thing you can do is to encourage them to seek professional help. This type of attachment can be extremely harmful and it’s important to get help from a qualified therapist who can assist in breaking the bond.

There are also a few things you can do to support someone who’s trauma bonded, even if they’re not ready to seek professional help. You can:

-Be supportive and understanding. It’s important to let the person know that you’re there for them and that you understand what they’re going through.
-Encourage healthy coping mechanisms. Help the person find healthy ways to cope with their emotions, such as journaling, exercise, or talking to friends and family.
-Encourage them to get help when they’re ready. Let the person know that you support their decision to seek professional help and that you’ll be there for them when they’re ready.

Conclusion

Thank you for taking the time to read this guide. If you know someone who is trauma bonded, I hope that it has given you some insights into how to best support them. Remember, it is important to be patient and understanding, as recovery can be a long and difficult process. If you are struggling with your own trauma bonding, I encourage you to seek professional help. There are many organizations and individuals who can Assist you in your journey to healing.

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